Skrevet av Emne: Melkekrampe/eklampsi  (Lest 1846 ganger)

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Melkekrampe/eklampsi
« på: 27 April 2006, 20:48:10 »
Er det noen her som har erfaring med melkekrampe/eklampsi hos katt?

(N) Blairwitch

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« Svar #1 på: 27 April 2006, 20:58:17 »
Har jeg aldri hørt om, har du prøvd å søke etter dette på nett?

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SV: Melkekrampe/eklampsi
« Svar #2 på: 27 April 2006, 21:33:46 »
Ja, det står bare et parr linjer...og mest om kuer.

(N) Blairwitch

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« Svar #3 på: 27 April 2006, 21:47:11 »
Pøv å send en mail til veterinærhøgskolen :icon_smile:

Heidi K

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SV: Melkekrampe/eklampsi
« Svar #4 på: 27 April 2006, 21:54:16 »
Jeg finner noe ang mennesker og slikt og hva eklampsi er. Vet ikke om det kan være interesant?

Heidi K

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« Svar #5 på: 27 April 2006, 21:55:39 »
Den her linken kom opp om katt http://home.online.no/~gpaag/vikingkatten/fodsel.htm

Skal lete mer.

Utlogget Marit

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SV: Melkekrampe/eklampsi
« Svar #6 på: 27 April 2006, 22:11:26 »
Fant en artikkel i Pandecats om melkefeber:
Eclampsia is an acute, life-threatening condition that can occur when a female cat is pregnant or nursing kittens. Eclampsia can be fatal if not treated in time.

How Eclampsia Occurs

Eclampsia is the direct result of low calcium levels (hypocalcemia) that result from the nutritional stresses associated with a cat nursing kittens.


Although the mother's diet may be fine, she may lack the ability to quickly shunt calcium to her milk without depleting her own body. The calcium is lost in the milk faster than it is absorbed from the diet, or faster than she can mobilize it from her own skeletal system. She cannot keep up with the demand for calcium in the milk, and so she depletes her own body and hypocalcemia results.

Symptoms

Signs of eclampsia are easy to recognize, especially when coupled with the fact that a cat is nursing kittens.
Early Signs
Nervousness
Restlessness
Irritability
Vomiting
Lethargic
Disorientation
Poor Coordination
Rejection of nursing kittens
Advanced Symptoms Requiring Immediate Veterinary Attention

Vomiting
Tremors
Muscular Weakness or Wobbling
Walking with a Stiff Gait
Extreme Leg Rigidity
Body temperature may increase to over 105° F
Increased Respiration Rates
Glassy-eyed
Timing

Eclampsia usually occurs within the first three weeks after the birth of the kittens, however it can also occur late in a pregnancy just before delivery.
Diagnosis

Initial diagnosis is based upon observable symptoms. A veterinarian can confirm eclampsia with a blood test to determine blood calcium levels.
Prognosis

If the condition is not promptly treated by removing kittens from the queen and providing her with an immediate source of calcium, it may progress to fatal convulsions.
Treatment

Remove the kittens immediately. They must be bottle or tube fed exclusively until the crisis is past.

The queen must be treated by slowly administering a calcium solution intravenously over a 10-15 minute time span. The cat must be monitored carefully for heart rhythm irregularities which can occur. If the heart rate increases or becomes arrhythmic, calcium administration must immediately stop.

If veterinary care is not immediately available, remove the kittens from the queen. Feed the queen milk a crushed up calcium tablet until you can get her veterinary attention. A Tums tablet contains 500 mg of calcium carbonate, an amount that is adequate for the average size cat.

Once the queen is stabilized, she should be continued on an oral calcium supplement as needed.

If she responds well to treatment, her kittens can then gradually be allowed to nurse.
Cats At Risk

Generally, the greater the quantity of milk produced by the queen, the more likely it is that eclampsia will occur. Litters do not need to be large to cause eclampsia but usually heavy milkers are at a greater risk.

Kittens seem to suffer no ill effects from nursing off a mother with developing eclampsia.
 

Prevention & Calcium Supplements

Once a female has had eclampsia, there is an excellent chance that it may occur again with future litters unless you take preventative steps.

Properly timed supplementation with a balanced calcium/phosphorus supplement is necessary.
Mvh Marit

"Until one has loved an animal,
a part of one's soul remains unawakened."
Anatole France

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SV: Melkekrampe/eklampsi
« Svar #7 på: 27 April 2006, 22:34:53 »
Takk for svar. Det gjelder heldigvis ikke meg, men jeg skal viderformidle dette
Var mest interessert i å vite om kattungene kunne ta skade, men det gjorde de ikke i følge artikkelen.....og moren har antakelig hatt en veldig fin melk
slik jeg forstår artikkelen